This post is part of our series on Illinois family child care licensing. For more on licensing in Illinois, see the following posts:

Illinois Family Child Care Licensing: An Overview
Types of Licenses
The Licensing Process
Training Requirements
Home Requirements

If you’re planning to open an in-home preschool, you will have to meet certain eligibility requirements. These requirements will differ slightly depending on the type of license you’ll be applying for. See the following table for eligibility requirements depending on license type:

 Day Care Homes

Group Day Care Homes

Primary caregivers

Age At least 18 At least 21
Education and training A high school diploma or equivalency certificate

Caregivers must have 15 hours of in-service training per year

Caregivers licensed to care for newborns and infants must have received training on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) and safe sleep

A high school diploma or equivalency certificate

Caregivers must have 15 hours of in-service training per year

The caregiver must have achieved:

  • 1 year of credit (30 semester/45 quarter hours) from an accredited college/university; OR
  • 1-year prior work experience in a nursery school, kindergarten or licensed day care center and six semester or equivalent quarter hours in child care/child development coursework from an accredited college/university.
  • The caregiver may have a current Child Development Credential in lieu of the college hours or work experience.
Other The caregiver may not be employed outside the home during the hours that child care is being provided. The caregiver may not be employed outside the home during the hours that child care is being provided.
The caregiver must have a plan which has been discussed with parents regarding child care services if/when the caregiver is ill or absent from the home during day care hours. The caregiver must have a plan which has been discussed with parents regarding child care services if/when the caregiver is ill or absent from the home during day care hours.

 Assistants

Age

Assistants must be at least 14 years old and 5 years older than the oldest child they supervise

A full-time assistant must be 18 years old. Part-time assistants must be at least 14 years old and five years older than the oldest child they supervise

Assistants under age 18 must work under the direct personal supervision of the caregiver at all times Assistants under age 18 must work under the direct personal supervision of the caregiver at all times

 Substitutes 

A substitute caregiver may be used in the home up to 25 hours per month and for an additional period of up to two weeks in a 12-month period. A substitute caregiver, at least 21 years of age, may be used in the home up to 25 hours per month and for an additional period of up to two weeks in a 12-month period.

 

Early Childhood Teacher Credentialing Programs (Group Day Care Homes only)

The Department will use the following criteria to review and approve early childhood teacher credentialing programs:

Eligibility Requirements:

  • Candidates must be at least 18 years of age.
  • Candidates must have at least a high school diploma or equivalency (GED).
  • The credentialing program must require a minimum of 640 clock hours of documented experience within the past 5 years working with children ages zero to 6 in a public or private school operated nursery school, kindergarten or licensed day care center.

Credentialing Process
The credentialing process must include:

  • The child care director’s recommendation in support of the candidate.
  • A review of the applicant’s interaction with children under direct supervision by an impartial person.
  • A minimum of 120 clock hours of broad based training that has been completed successfully and that has been documented. One semester hour of college credits in early childhood education is equivalent to 15 clock hours of formal in-service training. This training may be completed through:
    • Early childhood education courses at an accredited college or university; or
    • Documented seminars and workshops pertaining to the growth and education of children zero to 6 years of age, at educational conferences of recognized national or state associations, agencies, or educational institutions.
  • Professional resource file or portfolio that demonstrates the understanding of core professional content areas including, but not limited to, the following:
    • Principles of child growth and development.
    • Planning a safe, healthy learning environment.
    • Advancing children’s physical and intellectual development.
    • Supporting children’s social and emotional development.
    • Establishing productive relationships among family, school, and community.
    • Managing an effective program operation.
    • Maintaining a commitment to professionalism.
    • Observing and recording children’s behavior.
    • Understanding the development of children’s language.
  • An evaluation program that requires a professional review through observation and written assessment of:
    • Competence in the core professional content areas.
    • Interaction with children in the child care environment.
    • Professional portfolio or file.
    • Required training.
    • Verbal and written communication skills.
  • Observation and final assessment shall be done by an impartial committee or individual, not by the candidate’s own director/employer.
  • A renewal of the credential shall be required at least every 5 years and shall require at least 20 additional clock hours of training.  One semester hour of college is considered equivalent to 15 clock hours of formal in-service training.
  • All training shall be documented.

Approved Credentials
Child Development Associate Credential
Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition
2460 16th Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009
1-800-424-4310

Certified Childcare Professional
National Child Care Association
1029 Railroad Street, N.W.
Conyers, Georgia 30207
1-800-543-7161

Sources:


This post is part of our series on Illinois family child care licensing. For more on licensing in Illinois, see the following posts:

Illinois Family Child Care Licensing: An Overview
Types of Licenses
The Licensing Process
Training Requirements
Home Requirements

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