Our country is suffering.

Yet another unarmed Black man was killed by police, a Black EMT worker was killed in her home, a Black jogger was gunned down while running, and a Black birdwatcher was threatened when he asked a white woman to comply with park rules and use a leash for her dog. There is no reason to stay silent – individuals, families, communities are suffering, and are grieving. Our hearts ache with them and for them. The cracks run deep and we all have a responsibility to look at our part and do the work to build a new path forward.

What can we do, how can we help? 

Breaking up systemic racism happens when individuals come together to question societal norms and institutions, and this takes concerted work on the part of individual families. We have to teach our children and ourselves to speak up, to stand up, for our brothers and sisters when we see inequities and injustices occurring. We have to model kind and loving hearts, and reach out our hands to those around us. We have to question old models and ideas and examine the small and large ways we ourselves contribute to injustice. We need to pressure elected officials and look at systems of power because breaking up systemic racism also takes concerted work on the part of communities and broader society. 

Our commitment

In our work at Wonderschool we have the honor of working across communities, and it’s critical that we say very loudly and very clearly that Black Lives Matter. Our work allows us to help support small, independent business owners, many of whom are women of color, to create and sustain strong businesses serving the youngest of their communities. Beyond the work of supporting child care providers to earn a good living, beyond giving them tools to manage their businesses, we need to advocate for their worth and the absolute invaluable contribution they make to our families, our communities, our economies, and our world. 

As a company in the early learning space, we commit to doing our part to promote racial justice in ECE– for our directors, families, children, and broader communities. This kind of learning can and should start in the earliest years of life, and we commit to supporting our community of child care providers to incorporate that in their programs.

Mothers, fathers, families, teachers, employers, advocates, funders, partners, leaders – we are obligated for the greater good of our country and our world to shine light where it needs to be shone, and to demand that everyone is afforded the protection they need to be safe and healthy.

Looking for resources to help young children learn about racism, anti-bias, and tolerance? 

NAEYC Teaching/Learning about Race & Racism with Children and Families

The Conscious Kid Instagram page

Early Childhood Anti-Bias Books

PBS: They’re Not Too Young to Talk About Race

More resources available here.